Pacino – I Learned More About Acting From John Than Anybody

Posted:  January 12th, 2015 - ACTING, ACTOR, AL PACINO, JOHN CAZALE, THE DAILIES

A moving tribute to the talent of John Cazale by fellow actor Al Pacino.  Exertp from:

I Knew It Was You: Rediscovering John Cazale (2009) – IMDb

via rikinvasani

Lukas Haas

Posted:  April 21st, 2010 - ACTING, ACTOR, CHRISTOPHER NOLAN, GUS VAN SANT, INTERVIEWS, LUKAS HAAS, NICK CASSAVETES, STEVEN SPIELBERG

 

Lukas Haas. The fervently charming actor talks about a career that spans almost three decades in front of the camera.

Los Angeles, 2010

 

Interview by VIFILL PRUNNER

 

THENEWCINEMA: You have been a professional actor since you were five years old. That makes almost thirty years in front of the camera.  Do you still have a passion for acting?

LUKAS HAAS: Me, yes… yes of course!!!  It’s one of those jobs where… it is a real fortune to be able to do it… I mean acting as a profession.  For one thing it’s obviously a really creative job and there are all sorts of facets to it that keep it interesting and creative… Through my career I have met really interesting people and gotten to go to amazing places and done really interesting things I never would have expected to be able to do.  And at the same time I get to be creative and take on different challenges and different characters. So it’s a great, great job.  It’s hard not to be passionate about it.

 

TNC: You just finished shooting ‘‘Inception’’ with Christopher Nolan. Tell me about your experience working with him.

LH: Chris is great!  He is a really interesting guy and he is so in control of his craft… what he does… he is a real master of film making. You don’t get to work with all that many directors like that in your career.  I have worked with some great directors… but its only once in awhile I get to work with a director like that.  It’s impressive, he knows exactly what he is looking for and that gives you so much confidence in him. You know that he knows what he’s doing and you can rely on his vision. Sometimes you work with a director, especially if it’s a young director, and you… you’re almost trying to help them figure out what they want. But it was the opposite in this case… you had to keep up!

 

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Rachel Sheedy – From The Agents Perspective

Posted:  April 21st, 2010 - ACTING, ACTOR, INTERVIEWS

A conversation with a New York talent agent.

 

New York, 2010

 

Interview by VIFILL PRUNNER

THENEWCINEMA: Tell me about yourself.  What do you do?

RACHEL SHEEDY: I am a talent agent at Buchwald & Associates.

 

TNC: The agent, the manager, the publicist?  Who does what?

RS: An agent procures employment and negotiates employment, where a manager might act as an intermediary between the agent and the client.  A manager is helpful because they are a little bit more day to day.  Agents have many clients, managers usually only have something like ten clients… basically we have many more people to take care of so it is a less personalized service.  The publicist is someone that gets you press, gets you into parties, etc.  Publicists try to bring awareness to the things their clients are creating.  More and more careers blow up and people get famous because of how exposed they are… how much you know about them.  We have seen many people become famous for no apparent reason.  But they go to parties, they are exposed… and from there they become actors, or talk show hosts or spokespeople for lingerie or perfume or whatever it may be.  I don’t deal too much with those kinds of people…  I represent actors but exposure is important and actors have publicists to guide them in which kind of press will accentuate their career.

 

TNC: What is the proper order, you get the agent, then the publicist, then…?

RS: If you are a young actor and you are just coming out of school, then you will want an agent or agency to take you on. So they can send you out and introduce you to the casting community and the people around town who are going to help you get a job.  Some young actors get a manager first, but the problem is that a manager is not really legally allowed to negotiate employment for you.  So if you have a manager and you get a job, you are going to need either an agent or a lawyer to negotiate that employment for you.

 

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